Ballarat’s Riley a premiership CrowPhotos

Ballarat’s Riley a premiership Crow | Photos Ebony Marinoff and Talia Radan of the crows celebrate during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)
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Erin Phillips (left) and Abbey Holmes of the Crows celebrate during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chelsea Randall, Bec Goddard (Coach) and Erin Phillips of the Crows hold the cup aloft after winning the inaugural AFLW Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows poses for a photograph during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips (left) and Abbey Holmes of the Crows celebrate during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Tayla Harris of the Lions is consoled by Jan Cooper during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips (left) and Chelsea Randall of the Crows lead their team onto the field during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Tayla Harris of the Lions looks dejected after a loss during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Sarah Perkins of the Crows celebrates during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)Restrictions

Emily Bates of the Lions and Chelsea Randall of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Jessica Wuetschner of the Lions celebrates a goal during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Crows celebrate after winning the inaugural AFLW Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Lions line up for the national anthem during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chelsea Randall, Bec Goddard (Coach) and Erin Phillips of the Crows hold the cup aloft after winning the inaugural AFLW Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Abbey Holmes of the Crows and Jamie Stanton of the Lions compete for the ball during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Rhiannon Metcalfe, Bec Goddard, Senior Coach of the Crows and Chelsea Randall of the Crows celebrate during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images

Ebony Marinoff of the Crows celebrates during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Lions line up for the national anthem during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Susan Alberti (left) presents the Premiership cup to Chelsea Randall, Bec Goddard (Coach) and Erin Phillips of the Crows after winning the inaugural AFLW Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Sarah Perkins of the Crows and Leah Kaslar of the Lions in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Tayla Harris of the Lions kicks the ball during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Susan Alberti holds the premiership cup during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Brittany Gibson of the Lions is consoled during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Kaitlyn Ashmore of the Lions looks dejected after a loss during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Lions players look dejected after a loss during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Heather Anderson of the Crows is tackled by Jessica Wuetschner of the Lions during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Crows celebrate after winning the inaugural AFLW Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Bec Goddard, Senior Coach of the Crows (centre) celebrates with her players during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Georgia Bevan of the Crows is tackled by Samantha Virgo of the Lions during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Kate McCarthy (left) and Sabrina Frederick-Traub of the Lions (right) celebrate a goal during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Sarah Perkins of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Abbey Holmes of the Crows celebrates during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Sabrina Frederick-Traub of the Lions celebrates a goal during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Ebony Marinoff of the Crows kicks the ball during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Kaitlyn Ashmore of the Lions in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Emily Bates of the Lions looks dejected after a loss during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Deni Varnhagen of the Crows is tackled by Emma Zielke (left) and Kate Lutkins of the Lions during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Emma Zielke of the Lions (left) leads her team onto the field during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows in action during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Courtney Cramey of the Crows celebrates with family during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Courtney Cramey of the Crows is tackled by Samantha Virgo of the Lions during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chelsea Randall of the Crows and Tayla Harris of the Lions compete for the ball during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows celebrates with children Blake and Brooklyn after the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Shannon Campbell of the Lions is tackled during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Erin Phillips of the Crows celebrates with children Blake and Brooklyn after the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Crows sing the team song after winning the inaugural AFL Premiership during the 2017 AFLW Grand Final match between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows at Metricon Stadium on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Susan Alberti hugs Sarah Perkins during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Ebony Marinoff of the crows celebrates during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Crows players celebrate at the final whistle during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Crows players celebrate at the final whistle during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Sharni Webb of the lions takes a mark during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Crows players celebrate during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Talia Radan of the Crows celebrates during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Crows players celebrate during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Jessica Sedunary of the Crows in action during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Lions coach Crag Starcevich during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

Jessica Sedunary of the Crows in action during the AFL Women’s Grand Final between the Brisbane Lions and the Adelaide Crows on March 25, 2017 in Gold Coast, . (Photo by Jason O’Brien/Getty Images)

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Cahill a chance to start against UAE

Tim Cahill will definitely play against UAE in Tuesday night’s vital World Cup Qualifier, but Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou is yet to decide whether the star forward will start or come off the bench.
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A fortnight after suggesting Cahill’s place in the squad was under threat due to a lack of game time at club level, Postecoglou confirmed the Melbourne City striker is a key factor in the game plan for the must-win clash at Allianz Stadium.

Luzern striker Tomi Juric started in ‘s lacklustre 1-1 draw against Iraq on Thursday night before being replaced by Cahill in the final 20 minutes and Postecoglou will decide whether to stick with the same strike force after their final training session on Monday.

The n coach praised the development of 25-year-old Juric who is one of the few n centre forwards playing regularly abroad.

“Timmy comes into calculations but I thought Tomi was really strong on a tough pitch,” Postecoglou said. “We wanted him to get into some more threatening areas but some of our delivery to him was really poor. I like the way he’s developing as an international footballer. It takes a while for strikers to get to that level. Timmy’s a threat, and we got 20 minutes out of him. He’s certainly ready to play if we go that way but either way he’ll definitely play a part.”

A suspension to attacking midfielder Aaron Mooy opens the door for Melbourne Victory’s James Troisi to start with Denmark-based Mustafa Amini also pushing for a place in the first team. Amini has been on the cusp of making the 23-man squad for over a year and is a likely chance to make his debut for , either from the bench or in the first 11.

“He’s looked really good at training, really bright. He’s the kind of kid – he’s not a kid anymore, he’s a man. He’s got a real enthusiasm about him. He’s had a tough journey over the last few years. Yeah, he’s a chance for Tuesday night. We’ll have a look at things and we won’t change it too much but we’re certainly making a couple of changes,” Postecoglou said. “I think James Troisi will certainly come into contention and he did well for the 20 minutes he was on the other night. We’ll see how everyone else pulls up.”

Sydney FC fullback Rhyan Grant seems unlikely to make his debut on home soil as Postecoglou cooled suggestions of thrusting the right back into the team to face UAE. While impressing during training, Grant’s limited exposure to international football could hold him back from receiving his first cap on Tuesday night.

“All the new boys who’ve come in have looked pretty good at training. In the past we’ve liked to bring in guys and have them in the environment for a bit, like Mass [Luongo] and Trent [Sainsbury] and Jackson [Irvine]. Rhyan’s certainly done well in training,” Postecoglou said. “So, I think we don’t just throw them in there unless we think they can cope.”

Support for the Turnbull government crashes as Labor takes thumping lead

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull with Justice minister Michael Keenan and AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin at Parliament House in Canberra on Monday 27 February 2017. Photo: Andrew Meares Photo: Andrew MearesSupport for the Turnbull government has crashed, according to the latest Fairfax-Ipsos poll, and Labor now holds a thumping 10-point lead over the Coalition in the two-party preferred vote.
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Under a uniform swing, if an election had been held on Saturday, the government would have suffered an electoral drubbing and lost 24 seats, including cabinet ministers Peter Dutton and Christian Porter, as well as junior ministers Ken Wyatt and Luke Hartsuyker.

The poll will likely send shockwaves through the government, which believed it had started to recover politically after a series of policy announcements designed to tackle rising power prices, and may kick off a fresh discussion about the Coalition’s prospects under the leadership of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

It comes ahead of the final sitting of Parliament before the May budget, and after a week in which the government announced controversial changes to race hate laws, passed a $1.6 billion childcare package, and explicitly backed a cut to Sunday penalty rates.

The Coalition now trails Labor on a two-party preferred basis by 55 per cent to 45 per cent, while strong support for minor parties, including the Greens, One Nation and the Nick Xenophon Team, has held firm.

The two-party preferred vote is a big dip since the July 2016 election result, when the Coalition narrowly won by 50.4 per cent to 49.6 per cent. In November’s Fairfax-Ipsos poll, Labor led the Coalition 51-49.

Significantly, the 55-45 lead for the opposition is worse than the 54-46 two-party result recorded in August 2015, weeks before Tony Abbott was removed as leader by Mr Turnbull. It is only two percentage points better than Mr Abbott’s worst ever Fairfax-Ipsos result, 56-44, which came soon after the disastrous May 2014 budget.

Mr Turnbull’s personal approval rating has also gone backwards since November, falling 5 points to 40 per cent, while his disapproval rating has risen 3 points to 48 per cent. In October 2015, soon after becoming leader, Mr Turnbull’s approval was 28 points higher, at 68 per cent, and his disapproval rating was 17 per cent.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten’s approval also fell 2 points to 35 per cent, while disapproval remained steady at 53 per cent. ???Deputy Liberal leader Julie Bishop on Sunday dismissed suggestions the Coalition could change leaders again, declaring Mr Turnbull had the support of the vast majority of the party room.

“He’s a can-do prime minister,” she said, “He’s got a vision for this country, he’s got a lot of issues to deal with but he’s performing strongly and he will retain the support of the vast majority of the party room in order to lead us to the next election.”

She also dismissed as “fake news” a report that Defence Minister Marise Payne could be sent to New York as Consul-General, and denied Attorney-General George Brandis was headed to the High Commissioner’s post in London. Mr Turnbull will take heart from his higher approval rating and lower disapproval rating than Mr Shorten, but the gap between the two men is narrowing.

Similarly, Mr Turnbull still leads Mr Shorten as preferred prime minister, but the gap between the two men has narrowed to 45-33, a 12-point lead for Mr Turnbull. In November, Mr Turnbull’s lead was 51-30, a 21-point lead.

In comparison, Mr Shorten led Mr Abbott as preferred prime minister 45-39 in the August 2015 poll. Mr Abbott’s net approval at that time was minus 24, a far worse result than that recorded by Mr Turnbull.

A vote on the government’s $50 billion, 10-year plan to cut company taxes from 30 per cent to 25 per cent is expected in the Senate this week, and looks likely to be defeated.

At this stage, the most likely outcome is that the Senate crossbench will agree to cut the tax rate to 27.5 per cent for companies with a turnover of up to $10 million. ??? In findings that will give heart to the government ahead of the vote, 44 per cent of voters backed a cut to the tax rate to 25 per cent, while 39 per cent opposed the idea. Support for the cut was much higher among Coalition voters than Labor or Greens voters.

Both major parties’ primary vote has fallen since the election, but the slump has been worse for the Turnbull government. In July 2016, the Coalition’s primary vote was 42 per cent; that fell to 36 per cent in November and has now slipped to just 33 per cent. Labor’s primary vote at the election was 35 per cent, and fell to 30 per cent in November. It has rebounded to 34 per cent.

Voters’ apparent dissatisfaction with the major parties has translated into strong support for the Greens, who recorded a primary vote of 16 per cent, up from 10 per cent at the election, and “other” parties, including Pauline Hanson’s One Nation and the Nick Xenophon Team, which recorded a primary vote of 17 per cent, down one point since November but up four points since the last election.

The nationwide poll of 1400 people was conducted from Wednesday to Saturday and has a margin of error of 2.6 per cent

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Penalty rate cuts could blow $650m hole in federal budget

Dr Richard Denniss, Executive Director of the n Institute, will speak at the University of Wollongong tomorrow about the state of the economyRichard’s bio pic.jpg
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Cuts to Sunday penalty rates for low-paid workers could blow a $650 million hole in the federal government’s budget bottom line.

That’s the most conservative estimate of Richard Denniss, chief economist at the Institute think tank, who says the cuts will lead to lost personal income tax revenue and higher welfare costs for the government.

The potential impact of the cut on pay-as-you-earn tax revenue and welfare payments was not assessed by the Fair Work Commission, and the government has released no modelling to show the likely impact on the budget.

“This omission is surprising given the government’s stated focus on budget repair and the effort it has put into legislative efforts to secure reductions in welfare payments and other savings,” Dr Denniss says in a report.

The Turnbull government now estimates 300,000 to 450,000 people who work in retail, hospitality, fast food and the pharmacy sector will be hit by the decision. Unions put the figure at close to 700,000.

While not offering a precise estimate on the budgetary impacts, Dr Dennis says they are “significant and negative” and “are significantly larger than some of the government’s recent savings measures”.

If 285,000 people lost an average of $2744 a year and were all in the 21 per cent tax bracket, the reduction in income tax revenue would be $164.2 million a year – or $656.8 million over the next four years.

If 460,000 people lost an average of $2744 a year and half were in the 21 per cent tax bracket and half were in the 34.5 per cent tax bracket, then the reduction in income tax would be $350.2 million a year – $1.4 billion over the forward estimates.

Dr Denniss says cutting the wages of low-paid workers would also lead to a significant increase in welfare spending.

He finds that if 20 per cent of those affected by the penalty rate cuts were in receipt of welfare payments then the increase in welfare spending would be between $78.2 million and $126.2 million a year.

State government payroll tax revenue could also decline, as could GST revenue from declining consumer spending, he says. Some factors might partially offset the loss in tax revenue associated with a wage cut, such as increased employment or higher profits.

The Turnbull government has effectively backed the commission’s decision, guaranteeing Labor and the union movement will prosecute a ferocious industrial relations campaign between now and the next election.

The commission has recommended cuts in the retail sector, for full-time and part-time workers, which would see their Sunday penalty rates cut from 200 per cent to 150 per cent, while casuals would go from 200 per cent to 175 per cent.

Hospitality employees would face a cut in Sunday pay from 175 per cent to 150 per cent, fast-food workers would see their Sunday rates go from 150 per cent to 125 per cent for full-time and part-time staff, and casuals would go from 200 per cent to 175 per cent.

Ricciardo’s quest to stand on the podium over before it started

3 Daniel Ricciardo- Red Bull racing back in the pits after exiting the 2017 n Grand Prix at Albert Park. 26th March 2017 Fairfax Media The Age news Picture by Joe Armao Photo: Joe Armao
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Ferrari’s Vettel powers to victory

Disappointment in Melbourne is nothing new for Daniel Ricciardo; what should have been the Red Bull racer’s finest hour, a second place on his debut for the team at the n Grand Prix in 2014, turned to dust when his first career podium was taken away, his car disqualified for a breach of the technical regulations.

Ricciardo at least got to stand on the podium that day, soaking up the adulation of his home fans before learning of his exclusion on a lonely drive back to his city hotel that night. On Sunday at Albert Park, Ricciardo’s quest to become the first n to stand – legitimately – on his home podium was over before it started.

A rare crash in qualifying on Saturday left Ricciardo in 10th place on the grid, a subsequent five-place grid penalty for the team changing his damaged gearbox overnight adding salt to his wounds.

But if he thought that was bad, worse was to come on Sunday when his car ground to a halt in sixth gear with an electrical sensor failure as he made his way to the starting grid on the formation lap. The n sat in disbelief in his car on the run to Turn 13, his team frantically trying to come up with a solution from the garage to get his RB13 machine started. The car was brought back into pit lane, feverishly worked on while the other 19 cars in the field took the start, and was released into the fray with Ricciardo two laps down and plumb last.

Ricciardo’s only chance of sneaking into the top 10 points-paying positions rested on a safety car or heavy attrition for his rivals; such was his luck on Sunday that the former never materialised, and of the seven cars not running at the finish, his was one, an engine failure seeing him park up at Turn 3 on lap 29.

If Ricciardo shunts are uncommon – his crash in qualifying on Saturday was just his third in three seasons, none of which have come in a race – non-finishes by the n are as much of a rarity. Ricciardo’s third place in last year’s world championship was achieved partly through his speed and race craft, and partly by his unerring consistency, the n one of just two drivers to finish all 21 Grands Prix, 20 of them inside the top 10.

Sunday’s non-finish was his first since the 2015 Russian Grand Prix – a span of 26 races – and continued his wretched luck at home. Of the circuits that have featured in every season of his six-year career to date, only Japan and Brazil have produced fewer points, and more heartache.

“The car just switched off, it was instant,” a despondent Ricciardo said afterwards. “There was nothing, no procedure I could do to stay out there. I was lapping a few laps down, but I was getting some information, which was better than nothing. The more laps we get with this car, the more we’re learning. It was still valuable track time.

“It just snowballed from yesterday. The five-place grid penalty sounded bad enough, but then we had other issues. I feel like crap, but I feel for the fans too.”

Red Bull’s reliability woes in Melbourne have become an unwanted trend; Ricciardo pulling over before the race even started on Sunday came after his then-teammate, Russian Daniil Kvyat, didn’t manage a racing lap for the past two years at Albert Park after breaking down on the way to the grid.

With Ricciardo’s 2017 teammate Max Verstappen qualifying over a second behind Mercedes pole-sitter Lewis Hamilton on Saturday and finishing more than half a minute behind race-winner Sebastian Vettel of Ferrari 24 hours later, Red Bull needs to swiftly find both reliability and pace if it’s to retain its second place in last year’s constructors’ championship.

Nomads charged after weekend of brawls and shooting at Islington clubhouse

UNDER FIRE: Digitally altered image of the Nomads’ Islington clubhouse. The clubhouse was sprayed by bullets on Saturday night.FIRST came the steel bar attack on a man working out at the gym. Second came the glassing at a pub in Honeysuckle. Then came the hail of gunfire.
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Three men with links to the Nomads bikie gang have been charged after a trail of terror that began at a gym in Kotara and ended with a spray of bullets on the Nomads’ clubhouse at Islington.

In the latest public spat involving the region’s bikie community, it is alleged Blake Martin, 26, of Branxton used a steel barto attack a member of the rival Finks gang at the Bradford Close gym on Friday at 4.30pm.Thevictim, a 26-year-old man from New Lambton, suffered a suspected broken arm.

In a second incident on Saturday night, a 40-year-old Sydney man was allegedly glassed in the side of the neck by another alleged Nomads bikie at a hotel in Honeysuckle about 7.30pm.

Police said that man suffered deep cut to his neck and fell to the ground, where his head was allegedly stomped on.

At the same time and location, a 42-year-old Sydney man was allegedly head-butted and punched by another man–who police also believe to bea Nomads member.

The two injured men were treated at the scene before being taken to hospital.

About three hours later at 10.30pm, police raced to the Nomads clubhouse on Chinchen Street, Islington, after the building was shot at by an unknown person.

Police said they found several spent shells outside the building, as well as bullet holes in the front gates, doors and guttering.

Police saidmore than 10 people were inside the building, which was thought to be shut down after a raid in November.

At the clubhouse, police arrested three men who are alleged to have been separately involved in the two assaults.

Martin, who is alleged to have been involved in the gym assault, was charged with affray, malicious damage and use offensive weapon with intent to commit indictable offence.

The other two men, aged 26 and 32, were charged over the alleged assaults at Honeysuckle.Police were yet to lay charges over the shooting.

Newcastle Local Area Commander Superintendent John Gralton said theHunter’s bikie community was on notice.

“Members of OMCG [outlaw motorcycle gang] who break the law; from assaults, gun crime, malicious damage or traffic offences, will face serious ramifications,” Superintendent Gralton said in a statement.

“The three incidents over the weekend show that police from local area commands, as well as specialist commands, will continue to work together to stamp out illegal and dangerous activity.”

Where job prospects are brightest in NSW

They might face traffic gridlock and soaring housing costs but Sydney’s job seekers have far better employment prospects than those in the rest of the state.
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There was an average of 3.6 job seekers for every advertised job vacancy in Sydney in March compared with 6.7 nationally and eight in regional NSW, a report by job search engine Adzuna has found.

Sydney had 95 per cent of the state’s finance sector job advertisements, 82 per cent of trade and construction job advertisements, 80 per cent of hospitality industry job advertisements and 78 per cent of teaching job advertisements.

“Just hours out of Sydney in areas like the Illawarra, Newcastle and Riverina, job vacancies are scarce and competition for roles is fierce,” said Adzuna’s chief executive, Raife Watson.

The job vacancy figures underscore the recent strength of the Sydney economy compared with the rest of the state.

The city’s economy grew by 4.5 per cent in 2015-16, the best in 16 years and the third-highest on record. The remainder of NSW grew at just 0.4 per cent in that period.

Analysis by the consultancy SGS Economics and Planing shows that three Sydney districts – the CBD, the inner northern suburbs and the Ryde district – delivered 24 per cent of ‘s gross domestic product growth last financial year.

Sydney’s GDP per capita was $32,200 higher than regional NSW in 2015-16, the biggest difference on record.

The jobs report by Adzuna, which his jointly owned by Fairfax Media, helps explain this disparity.

It found salary levels in almost all job sectors were significantly higher in Sydney compared with other parts of the state.

Salaries for jobs advertised in Newcastle’s trade and construction sector ($68,481) were about 35 per cent less than those in Sydney ($105,845).

Healthcare is the only industry where job seekers can expect a higher salary in regional NSW ($122,688) compared to Sydney at ($104,364).

“This can be explained by the much higher rates of pay for locum doctors in regional ,” the report said.

Mr Watson said that while the cost of living was lower in regional , the salary disparity compared to capital cities “still leaves a considerable shortfall” for those living outside metropolitan areas.

In Melbourne there were 6.1 job seekers for every advertised job vacancy in March but the ratio rose to 10.4 in regional Victoria.

Nationally the number of job seekers per job advertisement was 6.7 this month, up from 5.75 in March last year.

Sydney’s ratio of job seekers to job advertisements was unchanged compared with a year earlier.

AFP adds to calls for greater whistleblower protections

Foreign bribery scandals involving n companies would “most likely not be detected at all” without company insiders blowing the whistle, the n Federal Police has warned.
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In a submission to a government inquiry into whistleblower protections, the AFP raised concerns about corporate cover-ups and said the law needed to be changed to help employees exposed to wrongdoing speak out and be protected.

The submission, to the parliamentary joint committee inquiry on whistleblower protections, says current protections for whistleblowers are insufficient to encourage insiders to come forward, especially in the private sector.

“In the corporate context, there may be a culture of ‘cover up’, where potential whistleblowers are discouraged or prevented from raising their concerns,” the submission says.

“This may occur where wrongful conduct was consistent with a corporate entity’s usual ‘way of doing business’.

Regulators and advocacy groups have been pushing for greater whistleblower protections for years.

n Securities and Investments Commission chairman Greg Medcraft has also backed offering money to whistleblowers in recognition of the risks they took and the damage that could be done to their career prospects.

The government inquiry is seeking submissions about improving ‘s public and private sector whistleblower regime, including the possibility of paying rewards.

The AFP says corporate fraud and foreign bribery are, by their nature, secretive processes, and with few witnesses, whistleblowers become an even more vital part of any investigation.

“Many AFP investigations have been instigated by whistleblowers and in many cases there are convergences with regulatory misconduct,” it says.

“In many cases, foreign bribery offences are only detected when reported by whistleblowers, without which they would most likely not be detected at all.”

Rio Tinto is one of several large n companies to be investigated recently over foreign bribery claims. The case relates to payments made to secure a project in Guinea.

It follows the Unaoil scandal, which revealed millions of dollars worth of bribes being paid behalf of corporate behemoths including Samsung, Rolls-Royce, Halliburton and Leighton Holdings.

The AFP says corporate whistleblowers face significant disincentives, including personal and financial costs, for speaking out.

“There is currently a lack of effective means to address these issues while potential whistleblowers weigh up the costs of coming forward to their personal lives and careers.

“In the absence of proactive measures to assist whistleblowers and offset future personal and financial costs, it is difficult for law enforcement to encourage cooperation and obtain valuable information.”

Ricciardo’s long week ends with a whimper

Around on dirt tracks, at speedways and kids’ karting meets, an army of volunteers keeps the beating heart of n motor sport alive. In Melbourne, in March they make their way to Albert Park to see the result of their handiwork and hope – not without good reason – that one of their own can make it to the top step of the sport’s pinnacle.
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Daniel Ricciardo – like Mark Webber before him – is one of those dreamers. And there’s always next year.

The Melbourne Grand Prix is fast becoming one that demands enormous reserves of energy and patience from the affable Ricciardo and yet delivers nothing but black eyes.

In his first year at Red Bull in 2014 Ricciardo became the first n to stand on a home Grand Prix podium since the world championship returned to this country in 1985. Within hours of that second-place triumph he was disqualified because of a fuel irregularity. In 2015, his Renault engine was non-competitive but he eked out sixth place. Last year’s fourth was deemed a stepping stone.

Ricciardo had every hope of snaring a top five start in Sunday’s race, but when he overcooked a corner in the final qualifying session and rear-ended the wall on Saturday he suddenly faced a 10th place starting position. That became 15th place after regulations around gear box changes saw the n take a further penalty.

On the installation lap Ricciardo’s car got stuck in sixth gear and suddenly the best chance he had of starting to race was from pit lane if his team could get it back to the garage and going in time before the race started. The Red Bull finally chugged to life two laps into the race and Ricciardo was sent out track with team radio offering a bright take on his afternoon. “Go on Daniel, get stuck in and have fun.”

By lap 29 it was all over. This time a fuel pressure issue stopping him dead on Lakeside drive behind the grandstand where so many dejected South Melbourne fans emptied onto the street in sporting sob stories past.

By the time he trudged back to the paddock, even Ricciardo’s sunny side was slipping ever so slightly

“On the plus side I’m getting out of here. It’s been a long week,” he said. “Don’t get me wrong it’s been fun I just feel bad for everyone, the fans … but it just kind of snowballed I guess from yesterday.”

Asked if he was disappointed he replied: “My throat hurts at the moment so I’ll let you figure that one out … I’ll be right I’ll wake up tomorrow and feel good. It’s been a long week, you know obviously I feel like crap, but obviously for the fans and everything it is not how we would have liked the opener to go.

“They cheered when I stopped on the warm-up lap and when I stopped now during the race, they still cheered and I heard them still showing a lot of support. That makes me stand here now feeling a lot better about myself than if I didn’t have that.”

And then the smile returned. “I’ve got a contract next year as well so I’m definitely back once more and hopefully that goes better.”

‘You don’t payWave buskers’

ns are less generous than tourists in giving money to buskers, and are becoming more stingy because of technology.
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“Nobody carries cash,” said Hemlock Mejarne, an acrobat and advocate for the rights of street performers.

“You don’t payWave buskers. Nobody’s got cash even if they love the show.”

Three-quarters of people express satisfaction with busking in Pitt Street Mall, according to a survey commissioned by the City of Sydney.

New busking locations, an audition process for buskers and a busking festival are among the ideas canvassed in the council’s Busking in the City of Sydney discussion paper.

Other issues discussed in the paper include managing noise, identifying new busking locations and dealing with other landowners who control areas such as Darling Harbour, the Circular Quay promenade and Barangaroo.

???Lord mayor Clover Moore said the discussion paper was designed to support musicians and performers on the streets of Sydney.

“Busking brings our public spaces to life, entertains thousands and helps talented musicians and performers make a living,” she said.

Yet the council may not be able to alleviate challenges caused by terrorism fears, technology and stingy audiences.

Mejarne said audiences were “hard everywhere in ” but particularly since the September 11 terrorist attacks stoked fears of terrorism.

“People were scared to gather in large groups in public,” he said. “And then as that started easing off, we’ve had the rise of plastic. Everyone’s carrying plastic. Nobody carries cash.”

Tourists were more likely to carry cash and pay buskers, he said. “Culturally hasn’t been generous with their street performers and buskers.

“If you can make a living out of busking in , when you go overseas you kick arse,” he said.

Mejarne said he supported the idea of a busking festival but opposed an audition process except for high-traffic areas such as Pitt Street Mall.

Fellow street performer Daniel Nimmo said he did not favour an auditions for buskers, apart from safety audits for danger acts.

“The streets should be a testing ground and development forum for all stages of artistic practice,” he said.

Nimmo said an audition process would exclude travelling buskers, who fostered a “better busking culture and better quality and more diverse acts”.

“The street can be brutal and beautiful,” Nimmo said. “It is an anvil – it either forges or it shatters. The public is brutally honest with their time, attention and donations.”

He said the council and the public were supportive of buskers but Sydney’s wet weather posed a challenge.

The council’s strategy adviser for live music and performance, Hugh Nichols, said Sydney buskers faced similar challenges to their counterparts in other cities.

“Major cities are becoming increasingly more populated and louder, so making sure that public spaces continue to be shared by the community and accessible to musicians and performers is very important.”

He said an audition process had worked well in places such as Melbourne’s Bourke Street Mall and the London Underground.

“The city does not regulate based on quality,” he said. “Becoming a busker can be a pretty confronting experience for a lot of performers because the feedback is immediate and audiences will generally vote with their feet.”

He added: “Children with recorders should absolutely be able to busk.”